The calling of Saul of Tarsus

It is apparent that the spread of Christianity, as well as the
development of the same among the gentiles, was unquestionably vital.
The mission of Christianity spread among the Gentiles in miraculous
ways as the lord demonstrated his mysterious and super natural powers
to the Gentiles, as well as other people who lived during that period.
The evangelization of Cornelius, by Peter proceeds with an extensive
description of and analysis of the theme of the introduction,
development of Christianity among the Gentiles. It is vital to note,
this mission was not accomplished by a single person, but various
anointed figures, which were employed, by God, to spread the gospel.
These individuals included Phillip, Stephen and Saul, who is the key
focus of this brief write up.
The calling and conversion of Saul to become an influential and esteemed
apostle occurred directly from the lord. This act was seen as a
supernaturally act of God who converted a man who was against the gospel
and who participated in the prosecution of people who proclaimed the
gospel. Evidently, God did the entire job of converting Saul and calling
him to work for the gospel as Saul remained inactive and played a
passive role, in the who ordeal.
It is vital to note that the significance of the mission of the calling
and conversion of Saul to work for the gospel and spread Christianity
among the gentiles is symbolized by the number of times that the story
is repeated, in Acts 22 and 26, as well as Galatians 1. Saul was a
fundamental instrument, which was employed, by God to spread the gospel
to the world of Gentiles.
The conversion and calling of Saul Acts 9:1-19
Luke documented the calling and conversion of Saul of Tarsus to exhibit
the sovereignty and supernatural powers of God. The initial stages of
the expansion of the church encountered numerous cases of repentance,
but the most significant instance repentance was that of Saul. It is
evidenced in the bible and other literatures of the gospel that the
conversion of Saul symbolized the unthinkable and miraculous case of
repentance, which gave the early church a significant boost in its
development. The other dramatic reality was that Saul was called to
occupy the summit of Gods missionary to the Gentiles who knew his former
actions and behavior of killing the prophets and preachers thus
building on the dramaturgy of the whole incidence.
Unlike the Ethiopian Eunuch who was who was converted on a chariot, the
conversion of Saul was rather different as he was converted in the
dust. It is significant to mention that Saul participated in the
prosecution of Stephen through stoning. Since the killing of Stephen,
Saul continued his behavior of killing all the Jews who proclaimed and
believed that Christ was God`s and the Messiah.
It is indicated that murder of believers and constant threats of
prosecution to the believers became the breath that Saul took every
minute. Saul is described as the horse of the war, which sniffed the
battle smell. Saul spread the battle breath to the rest of the disciple
the same smell that he had spread to the believers that he murdered
thus inflicting indescribable fear in the disciples.
The Roman high priests (Jewish) granted the high priest the mandate to
extradite strictly religious Jews who had escaped the Jurisdiction of
the Sanhedrin. Saul got letters from Caiaphas and these letters granted
Saul the mandate to apprehend the disciples of Jesus who were Jews.
Apparently, the Jewish disciples had fled Jerusalem to escape
prosecution and had sought refuge in Damascus.
Paul was an influential youthful member of the sect of the Pharisees,
which believed in the monotheistic worship of the Old Testament. This
background had complete influence on Paul that he considered any
proclamation of the Jesus as the messiah as blasphemous. Nobody was
allowed to claim that Jesus was the child of God, and Saul only
ridiculed the believers when he was not prosecuting them. It is
imperative to note that Paul head a pre-Christian outlook, to the
gospel. This attitude made Paul opposes the gospel with his entire mind
and heart and strength. To Paul, prosecuting the Christian believers was
an act of holy war, which glorified God, and that was why he was
overzealous in prosecuting the believers. This behavior made his
conversion a mysterious turn of events, and initially people had
problems believing Saul’s faith.
Possibly, the risen Christ revealed himself to the zealous prosecutor
and claimed the allegiance and faith of Saul. The conversion of this
notorious prosecutor of Christians occurred close to the Damascus city.
There were four characteristics that were experienced during the
conversion event. The initial characteristic was that Paul was busy with
his activities of prosecuting Christians, and the conversion surprised
Saul as he was not aware of such mysterious turn of events. The second
characteristic that accompanied the unexpected conversion was Jesus’
revelation to Paul. Evidently, Jesus must have revealed himself to Paul
as an individual, without the knowledge of his acquaintances.
The next characteristic was that following the conversion, Paul had
contact with trusted Christians as Ananias. Ananias was the first person
to recognize the faith of Paul, and he went ahead to baptize the newly
converted former prosecutor of Christians. Finally, Paul was deployed
immediately to take the gospel to the areas where the Gentiles were
concentrated. During the conversion, Paul went blind by an effect of
bright light, which originated from heaven. Evidently, Paul was
desperate and frightened and he immediately surrendered to the will of
Jesus, without turning back or resisting.
After the conversion was over, Paul was authorized to open his eyes and
follow the right that was shown to him, by Christ. Ananias laid his
hands on Paul and the scales that had blinded him fell from his eyes,
and his sight was restored. The technical part of this conversion was
that Saul went against the side of the army that was prosecuting the
Christians and Jews. Paul became part of the people who were being
hunted by the authority and prosecuted for blasphemy.
The commanders of the Jerusalem army went after Saul for betraying their
course of prosecuting Christians. At some point, he was forced to escape
from the storied building using a rope when soldiers came to arrest him.
It is imperative to note that, the task of spreading the gospel and
interacting with the Christians was not easy as the Christians knew him
as their former slayer. However, the grace of God enabled Saul to
survive the harshness and violence from people who hunted him to kill
him for his newly found faith. These problems made Saul famous and the
works of God and the grace of God were witnessed by Gentiles and other
people.
It became apparent that people believed in the gospel because of the
miraculous conversion and calling of Saul to serve the lord and spread
the gospel. God guided Saul throughout his mission, and he was saved
from numerous lethal dangers, which would have ruined the life of Saul
before completing the mission of spreading the gospel. It became easy
for people to believe the gospel and the works of the risen Christ
through the converted murderer who became a chief missionary the lord.
In conclusion, the early church experienced a historical act of
miraculous conversion of the former slayer of Christians to become a
chief of the missionaries of God. Paul had a negative attitude towards
the Christians who were proclaiming that Christ was indeed the Son of
God. Therefore, he worked in the forefront of the army, which hunted and
prosecuted Christians for their faith. Saul followed the Christians to
other cities and apprehended them for prosecution in Jerusalem. Saul
begun his mission of killing believers of Christ by killing Stephen, and
later the menace became an act of holy war. Imperatively, Saul was a
radical believer of the teachings of the Old Testament, which did not
recognize the message of the messiah. However, Saul was converted
miraculously to become a significant figure that spread the gospel to
the gentiles. The conversion of the former Christians’ slayer was
indeed a historic miracle, which was based on the powerful acts of Gods.
Bibliography
Harrer, G. A. “Saul who also is Called Paul.” Harvard Theological
Review 33, no. 1 (Ja 1940): 19–33.
Hedrick, Charles W. “Paul’s Conversion/Call: A Comparative Analysis
of the Three Reports in Acts.” Journal of Biblical Literature 100, no.
3 (S 1981): 415–432.
Hoerber, Robert G. “Paul`s Conversion/Call.” Concordia Journal 22,
no. 2 (Ap 1996): 186–188.
Meyer, Wendel W. “The Conversion of St. Paul.” Anglican Theological
Review 85, no. 1 (Winter 2003): 13–17.
Kern, Philip H. “Paul`s Conversion and Luke`s Portrayal of Character
in Acts 8–10.” Tyndale Bulletin 54, no. 2 (2003): 63–80.
Leary, T. J. “Paul`s Improper Name.” New Testament Studies 38, no. 3
(Jl 1992): 467–469. [1]
Hedrick, Charles W. “Paul’s Conversion/Call: A Comparative Analysis
of the Three Reports in Acts.” Journal of Biblical Literature 100, no.
3 (S 1981): 415–432.
Hoerber, Robert G. “Paul`s Conversion/Call.” Concordia Journal 22,
no. 2 (Ap 1996): 186–188.
Harrer, G. A. “Saul who also is Called Paul.” Harvard Theological
Review 33, no. 1 (Ja 1940): 19–33.
Hedrick, Charles W. “Paul’s Conversion/Call: A Comparative Analysis
of the Three Reports in Acts. Journal of Biblical Literature 100, no. 3
(S 1981): 415–432.
Meyer, Wendel W. “The Conversion of St. Paul.” Anglican Theological
Review 85, no. 1 (Winter 2003): 13–17.
Kern, Philip H. “Paul`s Conversion and Luke`s Portrayal of Character
in Acts 8–10.” Tyndale Bulletin 54, no. 2 (2003): 63–80.
Hedrick, Charles W. “Paul’s Conversion/Call: A Comparative Analysis
of the Three Reports in Acts. Journal of Biblical Literature 100, no. 3
(S 1981): 415–432.
Leary, T. J. “Paul`s Improper Name.” New Testament Studies 38, no.
3 (Jl 1992): 467–469. [1]
Kern, Philip H. “Paul`s Conversion and Luke`s Portrayal of Character
in Acts 8–10.” Tyndale Bulletin 54, no. 2 (2003): 63–80.
Insert Surname PAGE * MERGEFORMAT 1

BACK TO TOP